Tag Archives: Ventilation

How to Use Fire Escapes to Access Roofs Safely, by Firefighter Toolbox

Lt. John Hayowyk, Jr. of the Passaic, NJ Fire Department has been running a three-part series on accessing the roofs of Type 3 construction buildings over at Firefighter Toolbox. He’s already covered using the roofs of adjacent buildings and ladders. Today, Hayowyk wraps up his series with one of the most dangerous and least desirable ways to access roofs: fire escapes.

This article covers choosing which fire escape to use on a building, sizing it up, climbing it safely, getting your tools to the roof, and then climbing back down. Oh, and if you’re not checking out the fire escapes in your district on a regular basis, both for yourself and for potential victims, then you just don’t get it.

Read his article now.

Firefighter Toolbox, “3 Ways To Access The Roof Quickly – Part 3

How to Use Ladders to Access Roofs Safely, by Firefighter Toolbox

How to Access Roofs during Fires, by Firefighter Toolbox

Photo courtesy of Brotherhood Instructors, LLC

Last week, Lt. John Hayowyk, Jr. of the Passaic, NJ Fire Department posted the first of a three-part series at Firefighter Toolbox on how to use upwind adjacent buildings to access roofs. He continues that series this week with an article on how to use ladders safely while climbing up onto roofs. Read it now.

Firefighter Toolbox, “3 Ways To Access The Roof Quickly – Part 2

How to Access Roofs during Fires, by Firefighter Toolbox

How to Access Roofs during Fires, by Firefighter Toolbox

Photo courtesy of Brotherhood Instructors, LLC

We’ve posted a lot about roof ventilation here, including how to size up roofs, how to carry your saw and start it safelyhow to make safe ventilation cuts in flat roofs and peaked roofs, not to mention all the other things you can do on a roof. None of that’s going to do you any good, though, if you can’t get up to the roof.

This Firefighter Toolbox article – the first of a three-part series by Lt. John Hayowyk, Jr. of the Passaic, NJ Fire Department – tells you how to use upwind adjacent buildings to access the roofs of Type 3 or “ordinary” construction buildings. We’ll be following this series as Hayowyk covers roof access via ladders and fire escapes.

Tip o’ the hat to Christine Sarracino.

Firefighter Toolbox, “3 Ways To Access The Roof Quickly – Part 1

Flat Roof Ventilation on Multiple Dwellings, by Flashover TV

Flat Roof Ventilation on Multiple Dwellings, by Flashover TV

Photo courtesy of Brotherhood Instructors, LLC

Do you have multiple dwellings with flat roofs in your fire district? If you do, then you’ll want to watch this two-part video from Flashover TV.

Battalion Chief Ted Corporandy, Ret. of the San Francisco, CA Fire Department explains what you need to consider and do when venting these kinds of roofs, including:

  • What tools and equipment you need
  • How to size up a roof
  • Things to look for and how to deal with them, including skylights, scuttle covers, and vent caps
  • Where to cut your ventilation hole
  • Why you should cut only one ventilation hole
  • Where to make trench cuts
  • How to do horizontal ventilation
  • How to rescue victims from windows via the roof

Watch these videos now.

Thanks to FireRescue1 and Working Fire Training.

Flashover TV, “Ventilation Flat Roof Operations” Part 1 and Part 2

How to Handle Power Saws during Forcible Entry, by Fire Engineering and Traditions Training, LLC

How to Handle Power Saws during Forcible Entry

Courtesy of Brotherhood Instructors, LLC

You use your power saws for a lot more than roof ventilation, especially if you have diamond blades or carbide chunk blades on them. However, you have to hold your saws in awkward positions, like horizontally or at chest or shoulder height, if you want to use them for forcible entry and vehicle extrication.

That’s why we love this drill by Roger A. Steger, Jr., deputy chief with the Kentland, MD Volunteer Fire Department and an instructor with Traditions Training, LLC. It tells you how to hold your saw in places besides “right below you,” as well as how to position your arms and legs to help support a power saw’s weight in a variety of positions. Read it now at Fire Engineering magazine.

Traditions Training, LLC via Fire Engineering magazine, “Rotary Saw Forcible Entry Positions (PDF)